May. 6th, 2009

greenmama: (Default)
This is interesting...

INSECT PESTREPELLING PLANT
Antspennyroyal, spearmint, southernwood, tansy
Aphidsgarlic, chives and other alliums, coriander, anise, nasturtium and petunia around fruit trees
Borergarlic, onion, tansy
Cabbage mothmint, hyssop, rosemary, southernwood, thyme, sage, wormwood, celery, catnip, nasturtium
Colorado potato beetlegreen beans, horseradish, dead nettle, flax, catnip, coriander, tansy, nasturtium
Cucumber beetletansy, radish
Cutwormtansy
Flea beetlewormwood, mint, catnip, interplant cole crops with tomato
Japanese beetlegarlic, larkspur, tansy, rue, white geranium
Leafhopperpetunia, geranium
Mexican bean beetlemarigold, potato, rosemary, savory, petunia
Mitesonion, garlic, chives
Nematodesmarigold, salvia, dahlia, calendula, asparagus
Rose chafergeranium, petunia, onion
Slugprostrate rosemary, wormwood
Squash bugtansy, nasturtium, catnip
Tomato hornwormborage, marigold, opal basal
Whiteflynasturtium, marigold

Given what I've planted, I should perhaps find some tansy.   Seems to work for borer, squash bug, AND cucumber beetle.  Assuming this site (www.thriftyfun.com/tf29648744.tip.html) is correct...

Then again, on another site, I found this:

"Annual Marigolds can be used anywhere to deter Mexican bean beetle, squash bug, thrips, tomato hornworm, and whitefly. They are also known to repel harmful root knot nematodes (soil dwelling microscopic white worms) that attack tomatoes, potatoes, roses, and strawberries. The root of the Marigold produces a chemical that kills nematodes as they enter the soil. If a whole area is infested, at the end of the season, turn the Marigolds under so the roots will decay in the soil. You can safely plant there again the following spring. Nasturtium is another annual, in this case a trailing vine, that keeps away Colorado potato bug, squash bug, and whitefly." (www.sheridannurseries.com/gardensite/subGARDENTIP25mainframe.htm)

Which implies that the $16.99 I spent on a flat of marigolds is probably worth what I paid for it.  I may try to throw some Nasturtiums back there too, since I like them anyway and they taste yummy in salads.  I could train them up the fence, maybe...
--J
greenmama: (Default)

No time. Today or tonight. Early dinner needed.

Time for the crockpot (and can I just link once again to crockpot563.blogspot.com, Stephanie the Crazy Crockpot Lady's site full of a gajillion really good recipes that also give one a whole helluva lot of basic learning about what one can and can't get away with?)...

Crockpot Green Chili:
--Throw in a few pounds of boneless skinless Chicken Parts (in my case, breasts, because I ran out of thighs.  Why does that happen in my freezer but never on my body?)
--Throw in whatever assortment of veggies pleases you. In my case, that's half a bag of Trader Joe cut up bell peppers and a medium sized diced onion.
--Throw over this 2 cans or so white beans, drained. (Or not. I always drain the beans, because someone once told me that most of the fart-producing things are in the juice)
--Throw over ALL of it a big jar of green salsa.

Put the crockpot on low until you get home from work. Make some rice or something to serve under it.

Now natch, this will work with lots of different meats, salsas, and/or beans.  Beef you have to be careful of unless you get the absolutely totally lean no fat in it kind, or else your chili will be swimming in grease.  I've never been one to bother with browning the meat first; why use the crockpot if you have to mess up another pot first? That's not of the speedymama gestalt.  

This is one of my standby "what the hell are we eating tonight" recipes.  Frozen chicken, veggies, a jar of Something from the pantry. Italian veggies and spaghetti sauce? Chicken Cacciatore. Shrooms and marsala sauce? Chicken Marsala.  Beans and salsa? Chili. The possibilities never end.

Which reminds me:
Crockpot Veggie Chili
Disclaimer: I haven't actually ever tried this one.  But it's in my brain for when (I hope) my garden explodes and I have to find something to do with all the veggies.

This is easier still: chop up a bunch of vegetables into bite-sized pieces: onion, peppers, summer squash, whatever. Fill the crockpot about half full with them. Throw a couple of cans of beans (or a bag of ones I pre-cooked in my crockpot last fall that have been sitting calmly in the freezer waiting for this happy day) in; if they are still frozen, no problem.  A bunch of cut up peeled tomatoes too, preferably de-seeded, or a big can of pre-diced, with juice. (Remember that a crockpot is happiest when it's 2/3-3/4 full.)

Throw a jar or two of salsa over this.  How hot would depend on how hot you want your chili and how hot the peppers you put in are--remember it'll dilute a LOT, but also remember that if you included habaneros in the "bunch of vegetables" category you'll want to be prepared!

Put the crockpot on low for a long time. I have no idea how long, honestly, but I'll report back later--a workday's worth of simmerage would probably be plenty. 

If anyone tries this before my garden does its thing, let me know how it goes!
--J

ETA on the green chili:  needed more veggies and less chicken, actually.  A second jar of salsa, a third can of beans.  More onions, more peppers, and actually more liquid. I also threw in about 2 tsp of ground cumin, which gave it a nice flavor...

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